Make More Good for September 2019: Australian Freedom Fund

Make More Good for September 2019: Australian Freedom Fund

Edge Environment’s monthly ‘Make More Good’ donation sends $300 to a worthy cause nominated by a staff member. In September, 2019, Edge’s Senior Consultant, Nicole Thompson chose the Australian Freedom Fund to be the recipient.

With the introduction of the Modern Slavery Act we have seen organisations commence work on building their understanding of risk in their supply chain and preparing to publish their first modern slavery statements. While it’s great to see action from organisations on this issue, it’s important not to forget that the reason we are writing new policies, supplier questionnaires and contract requirements, is because there are men, women and children who are victims of modern slavery within our supply chains.

Perhaps one of the most important questions that businesses can be asking themselves now is, ‘What will we do when we find modern slavery in our supply chain?’ How will we respond and what support will be offered to that person?

Victims of modern slavery may have suffered physiological or physical abuse, may have been separated from their family and children, be unaware of their rights and in need of necessities such as accommodation, healthcare, counselling services or welfare support. Often the victim may be outside their country of origin, may need access to interpreters or may require legal advice on their immigration status or ability to gain compensation.

In light of the critical need for victim support in Australia, this month’s ‘Make More Good’ donation will go to the Australian Freedom Fund.  The Freedom Fund supports victims by providing access to basic services such as shelter, transport, food and emergency medical care when no other support is available. While businesses continue the process of eradicating slavery from their supply chains at a corporate level, we hope to see as much effort directed to those on the ground.  Thus, providing support and hopefully freedom to the estimated 4,300 people living in modern slavery in Australia.

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