Edge partner with University of Sydney on Adapt NSW – Human Health and Social Impacts Node

Edge is proud to announce our partnership with the University of Sydney and The NSW Government through the Office of Environment and Heritage to create a collaborative research partnership dedicated to the direct and indirect impacts of climate change on human health and social systems.

The Health and Social Impacts research node is a part of The Adapt NSW Research Hub, a collaboration between leading NSW universities and experts in climate-change and adaptation science, NSW Health and the Office of Environment and Heritage. The NSW Adaptation Hub (the Hub) was established in 2013 to leverage NSW’s collective, and multidisciplinary, science capacities to produce relevant and practical research to directly inform the decision making of NSW agencies and communities. Existing nodes include addressing key priority research areas:

• Biodiversity node Led by Macquarie University, in collaboration with CSIRO
• Adaptive Communities Led by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), University of Technology Sydney (UTS), in collaboration with the CSIRO
• Coastal Processes and Responses Led by the Sydney Institute of Marine Science, in collaboration with the Australian Climate Change Adaptation Research Network for Settlements and Infrastructure (ACCARNSI)

Our Human Health and Social Impacts node will focus on the relationship between climate change and health as well as the range of environmental, social and economic consequences, including regional variations in impacts and variability.
The research produced will address themes such as :

• Urban Design and the Built Environment
• Vulnerable populations
• Physical and mental health
• Health assets and services

We are excited to be able to contribute to the hub and intend to connect this research community with our industry partners to leverage knowledge into action. This is the key aspect of our involvement, converting the science into practical solutions to protect our communities in the face of a changing climate.

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